open access

Vol 76, No 12 (2018)
Original articles
Published online: 2018-08-07
Submitted: 2018-07-06
Accepted: 2018-08-03
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Correlation between serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration and arterial wall stiffness

Ewa Podolecka, Władysław Grzeszczak, Ewa Żukowska-Szczechowska
DOI: 10.5603/KP.a2018.0174
·
Pubmed: 30091129
·
Kardiol Pol 2018;76(12):1712-1716.

open access

Vol 76, No 12 (2018)
Original articles
Published online: 2018-08-07
Submitted: 2018-07-06
Accepted: 2018-08-03

Abstract

Background: Elevated serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentration is a risk factor for atherosclerosis, which involves remodelling of the arterial walls with their subsequent stiffening.

Aim: We sought to evaluate the relationship between serum lipid levels and the elastic properties of the arterial wall.

Methods: The study group comprised 315 men and women aged 55.84 ± 9.44 years. Serum glucose and lipid concentrations were determited. All subjects underwent blood pressure (BP) measurement, transthoracic echocardiography, and assessment of vascular compliance of large (C1) and small arteries (C2) using the HDI/Pulse Wave™ CR-2000 Research CardioVascular Profiling System (Hypertension Diagnostics Inc., Eagan, MN, USA). The subjects were divided into three groups: group I — LDL-C < 2.6 mmol/L, group II — LDL-C ≥ 2.6 mmol/L and < 4.0 mmol/L, and group III — LDL-C ≥ 4.0 mmol/L.

Results: There were no intergroup differences with regard to smoking status (p = 0.56), serum glucose concentration (p = 0.13), body mass index (p = 0.96), systolic (p = 0.17) and diastolic BP (p = 0.29), or C1 (p = 0.09). However, C2 was higher in groups I and II than in group III (5.12 ± 2.57 vs. 5.18 ± 2.75 vs. 4.20 ± 1.58 mL/mmHg × 100, respectively, p < 0.01). Multivariate regression analysis negated the independent associations between C1 and serum lipid levels. In contrast, C2 was independently inversely associated with serum LDL-C concentration (r = –0.15, p < 0.01).

Conclusions: Higher serum LDL-C concentration seems to contribute independently to stiffening of small arterial vasculature in otherwise healthy adults. Screening for dyslipidaemia in the general population and its prompt treatment are highly recom­mended.

Abstract

Background: Elevated serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentration is a risk factor for atherosclerosis, which involves remodelling of the arterial walls with their subsequent stiffening.

Aim: We sought to evaluate the relationship between serum lipid levels and the elastic properties of the arterial wall.

Methods: The study group comprised 315 men and women aged 55.84 ± 9.44 years. Serum glucose and lipid concentrations were determited. All subjects underwent blood pressure (BP) measurement, transthoracic echocardiography, and assessment of vascular compliance of large (C1) and small arteries (C2) using the HDI/Pulse Wave™ CR-2000 Research CardioVascular Profiling System (Hypertension Diagnostics Inc., Eagan, MN, USA). The subjects were divided into three groups: group I — LDL-C < 2.6 mmol/L, group II — LDL-C ≥ 2.6 mmol/L and < 4.0 mmol/L, and group III — LDL-C ≥ 4.0 mmol/L.

Results: There were no intergroup differences with regard to smoking status (p = 0.56), serum glucose concentration (p = 0.13), body mass index (p = 0.96), systolic (p = 0.17) and diastolic BP (p = 0.29), or C1 (p = 0.09). However, C2 was higher in groups I and II than in group III (5.12 ± 2.57 vs. 5.18 ± 2.75 vs. 4.20 ± 1.58 mL/mmHg × 100, respectively, p < 0.01). Multivariate regression analysis negated the independent associations between C1 and serum lipid levels. In contrast, C2 was independently inversely associated with serum LDL-C concentration (r = –0.15, p < 0.01).

Conclusions: Higher serum LDL-C concentration seems to contribute independently to stiffening of small arterial vasculature in otherwise healthy adults. Screening for dyslipidaemia in the general population and its prompt treatment are highly recom­mended.

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Keywords

arterial wall compliance, arterial wall elasticity, arterial wall stiffness, large arteries, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, small arteries

About this article
Title

Correlation between serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration and arterial wall stiffness

Journal

Kardiologia Polska (Polish Heart Journal)

Issue

Vol 76, No 12 (2018)

Pages

1712-1716

Published online

2018-08-07

DOI

10.5603/KP.a2018.0174

Pubmed

30091129

Bibliographic record

Kardiol Pol 2018;76(12):1712-1716.

Keywords

arterial wall compliance
arterial wall elasticity
arterial wall stiffness
large arteries
low-density lipoprotein cholesterol
small arteries

Authors

Ewa Podolecka
Władysław Grzeszczak
Ewa Żukowska-Szczechowska

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