open access

Vol 76, No 1 (2018)
Original articles
Published online: 2017-09-29
Submitted: 2017-05-19
Accepted: 2017-08-29
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The impact of individualised nutritional therapy according to DASH diet on blood pressure, body mass, and selected biochemical parameters in overweight/obese patients with primary arterial hypertension: a prospective randomised study

Alicja Kucharska, Danuta Gajewska, Mirosław Kiedrowski, Beata Sińska, Grzegorz Juszczyk, Aleksandra Czerw, Anna Augustynowicz, Krzysztof Bobiński, Andrzej Deptała, Joanna Niegowska
DOI: 10.5603/KP.a2017.0184
·
Pubmed: 28980293
·
Kardiol Pol 2018;76(1):158-165.

open access

Vol 76, No 1 (2018)
Original articles
Published online: 2017-09-29
Submitted: 2017-05-19
Accepted: 2017-08-29

Abstract

Background and aim: The aim of the study was to assess the impact of individualised nutritional intervention based on the DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) on the nutritional status, blood pressure, and selected biochemical parameters of obese/overweight patients with primary arterial hypertension. Methods: A total of 131 participants were randomised to the DASH intervention group (DIG; n = 69, 33 males) or the control group (CG; n = 62, 32 males). A three-month nutritional intervention was carried out in the DIG group, while the control group received only standard recommendations. Body weight, height, waist and hip circumference, body composition, blood pressure, serum glucose, and insulin and leptin concentrations were measured at the baseline and after the intervention. Results: Sixty-four (92.8%) participants in the intervention and 62 (100%) in the control group completed the study. In the DIG group a significant decrease in body mass, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, body fat content, fasting glucose, insulin, and leptin concentrations were observed in comparison to the control group (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The DASH dietary intervention provides significant benefits to overweight/obese patients with primary hyper¬tension.

Abstract

Background and aim: The aim of the study was to assess the impact of individualised nutritional intervention based on the DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) on the nutritional status, blood pressure, and selected biochemical parameters of obese/overweight patients with primary arterial hypertension. Methods: A total of 131 participants were randomised to the DASH intervention group (DIG; n = 69, 33 males) or the control group (CG; n = 62, 32 males). A three-month nutritional intervention was carried out in the DIG group, while the control group received only standard recommendations. Body weight, height, waist and hip circumference, body composition, blood pressure, serum glucose, and insulin and leptin concentrations were measured at the baseline and after the intervention. Results: Sixty-four (92.8%) participants in the intervention and 62 (100%) in the control group completed the study. In the DIG group a significant decrease in body mass, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, body fat content, fasting glucose, insulin, and leptin concentrations were observed in comparison to the control group (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The DASH dietary intervention provides significant benefits to overweight/obese patients with primary hyper¬tension.
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Keywords

primary arterial hypertension, obesity, insulin resistance, nutritional therapy

About this article
Title

The impact of individualised nutritional therapy according to DASH diet on blood pressure, body mass, and selected biochemical parameters in overweight/obese patients with primary arterial hypertension: a prospective randomised study

Journal

Kardiologia Polska (Polish Heart Journal)

Issue

Vol 76, No 1 (2018)

Pages

158-165

Published online

2017-09-29

DOI

10.5603/KP.a2017.0184

Pubmed

28980293

Bibliographic record

Kardiol Pol 2018;76(1):158-165.

Keywords

primary arterial hypertension
obesity
insulin resistance
nutritional therapy

Authors

Alicja Kucharska
Danuta Gajewska
Mirosław Kiedrowski
Beata Sińska
Grzegorz Juszczyk
Aleksandra Czerw
Anna Augustynowicz
Krzysztof Bobiński
Andrzej Deptała
Joanna Niegowska

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