open access

Vol 75, No 2 (2017)
Original articles
Published online: 2016-06-08
Submitted: 2016-02-15
Accepted: 2016-04-28
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Individualised renal artery denervation improves blood pressure control in Kazakhstani patients with resistant hypertension

Marat Aripov, Abdurashid Mussayev, Serik Alimbayev, Alexey Goncharov, Gulnara Zhusupova, Yuriy Pya
DOI: 10.5603/KP.a2016.0096
·
Pubmed: 27296285
·
Kardiol Pol 2017;75(2):101-107.

open access

Vol 75, No 2 (2017)
Original articles
Published online: 2016-06-08
Submitted: 2016-02-15
Accepted: 2016-04-28

Abstract

Background: The prevalence of hypertension in Kazakhstan is high, and the majority of patients are not adequately controlled. Treatment with renal artery denervation (RAD) could represent a useful therapeutic option for a subset of patients in Kazakhstan with resistant hypertension.

Aim: To assess the impact of RAD in a cohort of patients from Kazakhstan with resistant hypertension.

Methods: Between March 2012 and December 2013, 63 patients underwent RAD at our tertiary care centre. Eligibility criteria were office blood pressure more than 160 mm Hg systolic (SBP) or more than 90 mm Hg diastolic (DBP) despite being treated with three or more antihypertensive medications, including a diuretic. Ambulatory blood pressure was measured at baseline and at month 12, and monitoring also included impact on insulin resistance and renal function.

Results: There were significant decreases of 25 ± 24 mm Hg for ambulatory SBP during the daytime and of 26 ± 23 mm Hg for ambulatory SBP during the nighttime (p < 0.0001). We observed significant decreases of 12 ± 14 mm Hg for ambula­tory daytime DBP and of 11 ± 14 mm Hg in ambulatory nighttime DBP (p < 0.0001). A decrease in creatinine clearance was observed from 100.2 ± 33.6 mL/min at baseline to 90.2 ± 22.8 mL/min at month 12 (p < 0.001). Homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) decreased from 3.0 ± 4.6 at baseline to 2.5 ± 3.7 at 12 months (p = 0.007).

Conclusions: In this population RAD resulted in statistically and clinically significant blood pressure reduction at 12 months with minimal adverse events.

Abstract

Background: The prevalence of hypertension in Kazakhstan is high, and the majority of patients are not adequately controlled. Treatment with renal artery denervation (RAD) could represent a useful therapeutic option for a subset of patients in Kazakhstan with resistant hypertension.

Aim: To assess the impact of RAD in a cohort of patients from Kazakhstan with resistant hypertension.

Methods: Between March 2012 and December 2013, 63 patients underwent RAD at our tertiary care centre. Eligibility criteria were office blood pressure more than 160 mm Hg systolic (SBP) or more than 90 mm Hg diastolic (DBP) despite being treated with three or more antihypertensive medications, including a diuretic. Ambulatory blood pressure was measured at baseline and at month 12, and monitoring also included impact on insulin resistance and renal function.

Results: There were significant decreases of 25 ± 24 mm Hg for ambulatory SBP during the daytime and of 26 ± 23 mm Hg for ambulatory SBP during the nighttime (p < 0.0001). We observed significant decreases of 12 ± 14 mm Hg for ambula­tory daytime DBP and of 11 ± 14 mm Hg in ambulatory nighttime DBP (p < 0.0001). A decrease in creatinine clearance was observed from 100.2 ± 33.6 mL/min at baseline to 90.2 ± 22.8 mL/min at month 12 (p < 0.001). Homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) decreased from 3.0 ± 4.6 at baseline to 2.5 ± 3.7 at 12 months (p = 0.007).

Conclusions: In this population RAD resulted in statistically and clinically significant blood pressure reduction at 12 months with minimal adverse events.

Get Citation

Keywords

renal artery denervation, resistant hypertension, Central Asia, Kazakhstan, insulin resistance

About this article
Title

Individualised renal artery denervation improves blood pressure control in Kazakhstani patients with resistant hypertension

Journal

Kardiologia Polska (Polish Heart Journal)

Issue

Vol 75, No 2 (2017)

Pages

101-107

Published online

2016-06-08

DOI

10.5603/KP.a2016.0096

Pubmed

27296285

Bibliographic record

Kardiol Pol 2017;75(2):101-107.

Keywords

renal artery denervation
resistant hypertension
Central Asia
Kazakhstan
insulin resistance

Authors

Marat Aripov
Abdurashid Mussayev
Serik Alimbayev
Alexey Goncharov
Gulnara Zhusupova
Yuriy Pya

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