open access

Vol 66, No 4 (2008)
Other
Published online: 2008-04-24
Submitted: 2012-12-28
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Original article
Relative dependence of diameters of branches in coronary bifurcations after stent implantation in main vessel – importance of carina position

Dobrin Vassilev, Robert J. Gil
Kardiol Pol 2008;66(4):371-378.

open access

Vol 66, No 4 (2008)
Other
Published online: 2008-04-24
Submitted: 2012-12-28

Abstract


Background and aim: Bifurcation lesions are relatively frequently encountered in everyday interventional practice. Stenting of the vessel chosen to be main (usually the larger one) frequently leads to stenosis at the ostium of the side branch (SB) and compromises its flow (side branch compromise – SBC). The relative dependence of main and side branch diameters, based on the concept of carina displacement of stent struts, was examined in a cohort of patients with bifurcation stenting.
Methods: We accept that the basic mechanism for SBC after stent placement in the parent vessel is carina shifting from expanded stent struts. The ostial SB minimal lumen diameter (MLD), percentage diameter stenosis (%DS) at maximal and calculated actual carina displacement, as well as distal limb diameter (DLD) in the main branch were calculated and compared with actually observed values. Results: A group of 55 consecutive patients with acceptable quality angiograms formed the study population. General patient characteristics were similar to other bifurcation studies. Left anterior descending artery was predominantly treated in 73% of patients. There was worsening SB ostial stenosis after stent implantation (%DS increase from 48%&#177;23% to 69%&#177;21%, p <0.001) and final improvement because of kissing balloon inflation or SB postdilatation (post vs. final &#8211; 69&#177;21% and 53&#177;25%, p <0.001). Stent implantation causes straightening of the main vessel, evident from a significant increase in angle C (pre- 148°&#177;19° vs. 156°&#177;16° after stenting, p=0.007). Relations between observed and predicted values for main branch DLD and %DS demonstrated a good correlation between predicted and observed values (for DLD r=0.66, p <0.001, and for %DS r=0.53, p <0.001). There was an excellent fit of regression lines between theoretical predictions and actual measurements for side branches (MLD r=0.91, p <0.001, %DS r=0.89, p <0.001).
Conclusions: Carina displacement from stent struts is a major mechanism governing changes in coronary bifurcations after main vessel stenting. Improvement in the ostium of the side branch causes shifting back of the carina and a decrease of main vessel diameter. The long-term consequences of this phenomenon are not currently known.

Abstract


Background and aim: Bifurcation lesions are relatively frequently encountered in everyday interventional practice. Stenting of the vessel chosen to be main (usually the larger one) frequently leads to stenosis at the ostium of the side branch (SB) and compromises its flow (side branch compromise &#8211; SBC). The relative dependence of main and side branch diameters, based on the concept of carina displacement of stent struts, was examined in a cohort of patients with bifurcation stenting.
Methods: We accept that the basic mechanism for SBC after stent placement in the parent vessel is carina shifting from expanded stent struts. The ostial SB minimal lumen diameter (MLD), percentage diameter stenosis (%DS) at maximal and calculated actual carina displacement, as well as distal limb diameter (DLD) in the main branch were calculated and compared with actually observed values. Results: A group of 55 consecutive patients with acceptable quality angiograms formed the study population. General patient characteristics were similar to other bifurcation studies. Left anterior descending artery was predominantly treated in 73% of patients. There was worsening SB ostial stenosis after stent implantation (%DS increase from 48%&#177;23% to 69%&#177;21%, p <0.001) and final improvement because of kissing balloon inflation or SB postdilatation (post vs. final &#8211; 69&#177;21% and 53&#177;25%, p <0.001). Stent implantation causes straightening of the main vessel, evident from a significant increase in angle C (pre- 148°&#177;19° vs. 156°&#177;16° after stenting, p=0.007). Relations between observed and predicted values for main branch DLD and %DS demonstrated a good correlation between predicted and observed values (for DLD r=0.66, p <0.001, and for %DS r=0.53, p <0.001). There was an excellent fit of regression lines between theoretical predictions and actual measurements for side branches (MLD r=0.91, p <0.001, %DS r=0.89, p <0.001).
Conclusions: Carina displacement from stent struts is a major mechanism governing changes in coronary bifurcations after main vessel stenting. Improvement in the ostium of the side branch causes shifting back of the carina and a decrease of main vessel diameter. The long-term consequences of this phenomenon are not currently known.
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Keywords

coronary bifurcation stenosis; provisional stenting; prediction of immediate results

About this article
Title

Original article
Relative dependence of diameters of branches in coronary bifurcations after stent implantation in main vessel – importance of carina position

Journal

Kardiologia Polska (Polish Heart Journal)

Issue

Vol 66, No 4 (2008)

Pages

371-378

Published online

2008-04-24

Bibliographic record

Kardiol Pol 2008;66(4):371-378.

Keywords

coronary bifurcation stenosis
provisional stenting
prediction of immediate results

Authors

Dobrin Vassilev
Robert J. Gil

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