open access

Vol 66, No 5 (2008)
Other
Published online: 2008-05-26
Submitted: 2012-12-28
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Original article
Social support level in relation to metabolic syndrome – results of the SOPKARD study

Anna Pakalska-Korcala, Tomasz Zdrojewski, Jerzy Piwoński, Katarzyna Gil, Kamil Chwojnicki, Agata Ignaszewska-Wyrzykowska, Milena Mielczarek, Piotr Radziwiłłowicz, Jerzy Landowski, Bogdan Wyrzykowski
Kardiol Pol 2008;66(5):500-505.

open access

Vol 66, No 5 (2008)
Other
Published online: 2008-05-26
Submitted: 2012-12-28

Abstract


Background: Low level of social support is one of the psychosocial cardiovascular risk factors. Moreover, social support level (SSL) has been reported to be associated with components of metabolic syndrome (MS). Aim: To evaluate the association of SSL with MS in 50- and 60-year-old citizens of Sopot.
Methods: The study covered 476 citizens of Sopot (218 males – M; 258 females – F), aged 50-60 years, invited to take part in the screening project SOPKARD aimed at increasing detectability of hypertension, dyslipidaemia and diabetes mellitus in 2002-2003. Patients with MS were diagnosed according to the AHA/NHLBI criteria (2007). The Berkman and Syme’s questionnaire was used for assessment of SSL which was categorised into 3 groups: low, medium and high.
Results: Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 34% (W 29%, M 39%, p <0.05) of examined subjects. The prevalence of MS criteria was as follows: elevated blood pressure 68% (F 67%, M 69%, NS), elevated fasting glucose 48% (W 45%, M 53%, p=0.08), elevated waist circumference 30% (W 33%, M 25%, p=0.06), hypertriglyceridaemia 42% (F 41%, M 42%, NS) and low level of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) 23% (W 23%, M 23%, NS). Low SSL was observed in 50% of studied subjects (W 58%, M 39%), middle SSL in 31% (F 29%, M 35%) and high in 19% (F 13%, M 26%). In men with low SSL, MS and low level of HDL-C were found twice as frequent as in men with high SSL (45 vs. 22%, p <0.05; 24 vs. 12%, p <0.05). High level of triglycerides was observed significantly more frequently in women with low SSL than in those with high SSL (51 vs. 21%, p <0.05). Results of regression analysis showed that in men (all and 60-year olds) SSL was significantly associated with MS prevalence (p <0.05). In women, SSL was related to elevated fasting glucose prevalence (p <0.001). Moreover, in 50-year-old women SSL was significantly associated with MS (p=0.05) and elevated waist circumference (p <0.0001). All these relationships were independent of education.
Conclusions: The examined group of middle-aged persons, especially women, was characterised by high frequency of low SSL. Metabolic syndrome and its components were found more frequently in persons with low SSL, compared to those with high SSL. Low SSL was significantly associated with occurrence of MS and dyslipidaemia in men and women, and elevated fasting glucose and elevated waist circumference in 50-year old women.

Abstract


Background: Low level of social support is one of the psychosocial cardiovascular risk factors. Moreover, social support level (SSL) has been reported to be associated with components of metabolic syndrome (MS). Aim: To evaluate the association of SSL with MS in 50- and 60-year-old citizens of Sopot.
Methods: The study covered 476 citizens of Sopot (218 males &#8211; M; 258 females &#8211; F), aged 50-60 years, invited to take part in the screening project SOPKARD aimed at increasing detectability of hypertension, dyslipidaemia and diabetes mellitus in 2002-2003. Patients with MS were diagnosed according to the AHA/NHLBI criteria (2007). The Berkman and Syme&#8217;s questionnaire was used for assessment of SSL which was categorised into 3 groups: low, medium and high.
Results: Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 34% (W 29%, M 39%, p <0.05) of examined subjects. The prevalence of MS criteria was as follows: elevated blood pressure 68% (F 67%, M 69%, NS), elevated fasting glucose 48% (W 45%, M 53%, p=0.08), elevated waist circumference 30% (W 33%, M 25%, p=0.06), hypertriglyceridaemia 42% (F 41%, M 42%, NS) and low level of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) 23% (W 23%, M 23%, NS). Low SSL was observed in 50% of studied subjects (W 58%, M 39%), middle SSL in 31% (F 29%, M 35%) and high in 19% (F 13%, M 26%). In men with low SSL, MS and low level of HDL-C were found twice as frequent as in men with high SSL (45 vs. 22%, p <0.05; 24 vs. 12%, p <0.05). High level of triglycerides was observed significantly more frequently in women with low SSL than in those with high SSL (51 vs. 21%, p <0.05). Results of regression analysis showed that in men (all and 60-year olds) SSL was significantly associated with MS prevalence (p <0.05). In women, SSL was related to elevated fasting glucose prevalence (p <0.001). Moreover, in 50-year-old women SSL was significantly associated with MS (p=0.05) and elevated waist circumference (p <0.0001). All these relationships were independent of education.
Conclusions: The examined group of middle-aged persons, especially women, was characterised by high frequency of low SSL. Metabolic syndrome and its components were found more frequently in persons with low SSL, compared to those with high SSL. Low SSL was significantly associated with occurrence of MS and dyslipidaemia in men and women, and elevated fasting glucose and elevated waist circumference in 50-year old women.
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Keywords

social support level – metabolic syndrome

About this article
Title

Original article
Social support level in relation to metabolic syndrome – results of the SOPKARD study

Journal

Kardiologia Polska (Polish Heart Journal)

Issue

Vol 66, No 5 (2008)

Pages

500-505

Published online

2008-05-26

Bibliographic record

Kardiol Pol 2008;66(5):500-505.

Keywords

social support level – metabolic syndrome

Authors

Anna Pakalska-Korcala
Tomasz Zdrojewski
Jerzy Piwoński
Katarzyna Gil
Kamil Chwojnicki
Agata Ignaszewska-Wyrzykowska
Milena Mielczarek
Piotr Radziwiłłowicz
Jerzy Landowski
Bogdan Wyrzykowski

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