open access

Vol 68, No 10 (2010)
Original articles
Published online: 2010-10-22
Submitted: 2012-12-28
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Quality of life and depression in patients with different patterns of atrial fibrillation

Rafał Dąbrowski, Edyta Smolis-Bąk, Ilona Kowalik, Barbara Kazimierska, Mariola Wójcicka, Hanna Szwed
Kardiol Pol 2010;68(10):1133-1139.

open access

Vol 68, No 10 (2010)
Original articles
Published online: 2010-10-22
Submitted: 2012-12-28

Abstract


Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is difficult to cure and significantly affects quality of life was well as emotional status of patients.
Aim: To evaluate quality of life and depression level in patients with various patterns of AF.
Methods: We studied 150 consecutive patients with AF aged 35–83 years, including 61 patients with paroxysmal AF, 46 patients with persistent AF, and 43 patients with permanent AF. The control group included 70 healthy persons (mean age: 55.5 ± 14.5 years). Quality of life was estimated using the Nottingham Health Profile questionnaire. Risk of depression occurrence was estimated using the Beck Depression Inventory scale. Physical abilities, energy level, pain, emotional reactions, sleep, social isolation, problems with work, family life and sexual life were analysed.
Results: The mean age of patients with paroxysmal AF was higher in comparison to patients with permanent AF (68.4 ± 9.4 vs 62.0 ± 9.2 years, p < 0.05). In patients with all AF forms, the prevalence of symptoms indicating depression was significantly higher in comparison with control group (paroxysmal AF: 10.8 ± 5.8%, persistent AF: 10.0 ± 6.4%, permanent AF: 10.1 ± ± 7.2% vs 5.7 ± 5.8% in controls, p < 0.01). The level of depression was higher in women regardless of AF form (p < 0.005). Patients with paroxysmal and permanent AF had lower scores of emotional reactions (p < 0.05) and social isolation (p < 0.05) in comparison with the control group. All patients with AF had lower scores of energy level in comparison with the control group (paroxysmal AF: 1.2 ± 0.2, persistent AF: 1.1 ± 0.2, permanent AF: 1.2 ± 0.2 vs 0.5 ± 0.1 in controls, p < 0.005). Patients with paroxysmal, persistent and permanent AF had greater degree of activity limitations than the control group (1.8 ± 0.2, 1.7 ± 0.3, 2.1 ± 0.3, respectively, vs 1.0 ± 0.2, p < 0.005). Limitations of work were detected in 28.6-35.9% of patients with various forms of AF, sex life disturbances in 23.8–33.9% of patients, and family life problems in 10.3-21.4% of patients. The lowest results of these scores were noted in patients with paroxysmal AF.
Conclusions: Atrial fibrillation, independently of its form, has substantial impact on the risk of depression occurrence. Patients with paroxysmal and permanent AF had lower self-evaluation of their energy level. In all studied groups of AF patients, the arrhythmia significantly limited quality of life, especially sexual life as well as professional and home activity.
Kardiol Pol 2010; 68, 10: 1133-1139

Abstract


Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is difficult to cure and significantly affects quality of life was well as emotional status of patients.
Aim: To evaluate quality of life and depression level in patients with various patterns of AF.
Methods: We studied 150 consecutive patients with AF aged 35–83 years, including 61 patients with paroxysmal AF, 46 patients with persistent AF, and 43 patients with permanent AF. The control group included 70 healthy persons (mean age: 55.5 ± 14.5 years). Quality of life was estimated using the Nottingham Health Profile questionnaire. Risk of depression occurrence was estimated using the Beck Depression Inventory scale. Physical abilities, energy level, pain, emotional reactions, sleep, social isolation, problems with work, family life and sexual life were analysed.
Results: The mean age of patients with paroxysmal AF was higher in comparison to patients with permanent AF (68.4 ± 9.4 vs 62.0 ± 9.2 years, p < 0.05). In patients with all AF forms, the prevalence of symptoms indicating depression was significantly higher in comparison with control group (paroxysmal AF: 10.8 ± 5.8%, persistent AF: 10.0 ± 6.4%, permanent AF: 10.1 ± ± 7.2% vs 5.7 ± 5.8% in controls, p < 0.01). The level of depression was higher in women regardless of AF form (p < 0.005). Patients with paroxysmal and permanent AF had lower scores of emotional reactions (p < 0.05) and social isolation (p < 0.05) in comparison with the control group. All patients with AF had lower scores of energy level in comparison with the control group (paroxysmal AF: 1.2 ± 0.2, persistent AF: 1.1 ± 0.2, permanent AF: 1.2 ± 0.2 vs 0.5 ± 0.1 in controls, p < 0.005). Patients with paroxysmal, persistent and permanent AF had greater degree of activity limitations than the control group (1.8 ± 0.2, 1.7 ± 0.3, 2.1 ± 0.3, respectively, vs 1.0 ± 0.2, p < 0.005). Limitations of work were detected in 28.6-35.9% of patients with various forms of AF, sex life disturbances in 23.8–33.9% of patients, and family life problems in 10.3-21.4% of patients. The lowest results of these scores were noted in patients with paroxysmal AF.
Conclusions: Atrial fibrillation, independently of its form, has substantial impact on the risk of depression occurrence. Patients with paroxysmal and permanent AF had lower self-evaluation of their energy level. In all studied groups of AF patients, the arrhythmia significantly limited quality of life, especially sexual life as well as professional and home activity.
Kardiol Pol 2010; 68, 10: 1133-1139
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Keywords

atrial fibrillation; quality of life; depression

About this article
Title

Quality of life and depression in patients with different patterns of atrial fibrillation

Journal

Kardiologia Polska (Polish Heart Journal)

Issue

Vol 68, No 10 (2010)

Pages

1133-1139

Published online

2010-10-22

Bibliographic record

Kardiol Pol 2010;68(10):1133-1139.

Keywords

atrial fibrillation
quality of life
depression

Authors

Rafał Dąbrowski
Edyta Smolis-Bąk
Ilona Kowalik
Barbara Kazimierska
Mariola Wójcicka
Hanna Szwed

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