open access

Vol 68, No 11 (2010)
Original articles
Published online: 2010-11-24
Submitted: 2012-12-28
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Patients with no significant lesions in coronary arteries and ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction have worse outcome than patients with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: analysis from PL-ACS Registry

Anna Maria Frycz-Kurek, Marek Gierlotka, Mariusz Gąsior, Krzysztof Wilczek, Andrzej Lekston, Zbigniew Kalarus, Lech Poloński
Kardiol Pol 2010;68(11):1211-1217.

open access

Vol 68, No 11 (2010)
Original articles
Published online: 2010-11-24
Submitted: 2012-12-28

Abstract


Background: Acute myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with chronic coronary artery disease is usually associated with a rupture of atherosclerotic plaque with subsequent thrombus formation and reduction or block of blood flow what leads to necrosis of myocardium supplied by occluded artery. In some patients with MI, there are no significant lesions in coronary arteries.
Aim: The comparative analysis of ST-segment elevation MI (STEMI) vs non-ST-segment elevation MI (NSTEMI) patients without significant angiographic lesions in short and long-term observation as well as identification of predictors of adverse long-term prognosis.
Methods: We analysed all subsequent patients hospitalised due to STEMI and NSTEMI, included in the Polish Registry of Acute Coronary Syndromes in years 2003-2006. Only patients without significant lesions in coronary arteries (stenosis ≤ 50%) were included. Patients were divided into two groups: STEMI and NSTEMI. In these groups we analysed in-hospital parameters, the frequency of cardiac adverse events during hospitalisation and mortality at 30 days, 6 months and 1 year.
Results: Patients with MI and no angiographically significant lesions in coronary arteries comprised 2.9% (n = 972) of all patients hospitalised due to MI (n = 32,959). Risk factors of coronary disease were observed more often in patients with NSTEMI. Mortality during hospitalisation, as well as after 30 days, 6 months, and 1 year was significantly higher in STEMI vs NSTEMI patients (3.5% vs 0.8%, 5.4% vs 0.8%, 8.15% vs 3.3%, 9.2% vs 4.6%).
Conclusions: 1. In-hospital and long-term prognosis was worse in STEMI vs NSTEMI patients. 2. The independent predictors of adverse long-term prognosis during 1 year observation are: older age, risk factors of coronary disease like diabetes mellitus and obesity, depressed left ventricular systolic function, cardiogenic shock and STEMI.
Kardiol Pol 2010; 68, 11: 1211-1217

Abstract


Background: Acute myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with chronic coronary artery disease is usually associated with a rupture of atherosclerotic plaque with subsequent thrombus formation and reduction or block of blood flow what leads to necrosis of myocardium supplied by occluded artery. In some patients with MI, there are no significant lesions in coronary arteries.
Aim: The comparative analysis of ST-segment elevation MI (STEMI) vs non-ST-segment elevation MI (NSTEMI) patients without significant angiographic lesions in short and long-term observation as well as identification of predictors of adverse long-term prognosis.
Methods: We analysed all subsequent patients hospitalised due to STEMI and NSTEMI, included in the Polish Registry of Acute Coronary Syndromes in years 2003-2006. Only patients without significant lesions in coronary arteries (stenosis ≤ 50%) were included. Patients were divided into two groups: STEMI and NSTEMI. In these groups we analysed in-hospital parameters, the frequency of cardiac adverse events during hospitalisation and mortality at 30 days, 6 months and 1 year.
Results: Patients with MI and no angiographically significant lesions in coronary arteries comprised 2.9% (n = 972) of all patients hospitalised due to MI (n = 32,959). Risk factors of coronary disease were observed more often in patients with NSTEMI. Mortality during hospitalisation, as well as after 30 days, 6 months, and 1 year was significantly higher in STEMI vs NSTEMI patients (3.5% vs 0.8%, 5.4% vs 0.8%, 8.15% vs 3.3%, 9.2% vs 4.6%).
Conclusions: 1. In-hospital and long-term prognosis was worse in STEMI vs NSTEMI patients. 2. The independent predictors of adverse long-term prognosis during 1 year observation are: older age, risk factors of coronary disease like diabetes mellitus and obesity, depressed left ventricular systolic function, cardiogenic shock and STEMI.
Kardiol Pol 2010; 68, 11: 1211-1217
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Keywords

myocardial infarction; coronary arteries without significant lesions

About this article
Title

Patients with no significant lesions in coronary arteries and ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction have worse outcome than patients with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: analysis from PL-ACS Registry

Journal

Kardiologia Polska (Polish Heart Journal)

Issue

Vol 68, No 11 (2010)

Pages

1211-1217

Published online

2010-11-24

Bibliographic record

Kardiol Pol 2010;68(11):1211-1217.

Keywords

myocardial infarction
coronary arteries without significant lesions

Authors

Anna Maria Frycz-Kurek
Marek Gierlotka
Mariusz Gąsior
Krzysztof Wilczek
Andrzej Lekston
Zbigniew Kalarus
Lech Poloński

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